Aeneid II (GCSE Latin)


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Aeneid II

lines 506–558, 705–740, 768–794

Virgil

GCSE Latin set text 2020-2022

Aeneas Flees Burning Troy (1598) by Federico Barocci

The Aeneid

Virgil’s Aeneid is an epic poem written towards the end of the 1st century BCE, after Octavian had become Augustus, Rome’s first emperor, bringing an end to 100 years of civil wars.

The poem is modelled on the Greek epic poems the Iliad and the Odyssey, which were written down in the 8th century BCE. It follows the quest of Aeneas, a refugee from the Trojan War in Asia, to found a new city in the west. Although the core narrative of his wanderings covers just a few years, the poem constantly projects and resounds through 1,000 years of Roman history, providing a line of divine descent from Jupiter to Augustus.

The set text

The set text focuses on the fall of Troy, the death of King Priam, and Aeneas’ attempt to escape the burning city with his family. Aeneas himself is narrating the story, at the court of the African queen Dido (an imitation of when Odysseus tells the story of his troubles to King Alcinous in the Odyssey).

Aeneas has already explained to Dido how the Greeks tricked the Trojans with the Wooden Horse, how he was warned by the ghost of his cousin Hector to flee Troy to found a new city, and how he tried to save Troy by tearing through the city streets with a band of armed Trojans. He is now recounting what he witnessed at the palace of king Priam.

The palace has been invaded, and Priam’s instinct is to arm himself and fight (1), but his wife, Hecuba, tells him to take refuge with her at the altar. One of Priam’s many sons, Polites, is fleeing through the palace, being chased by the son of Achilles, Pyrrhus (aka Neoptolemus) (2). Priam criticises Pyrrhus for his cruelty (3), but Polites and Priam are slaughtered, and we see the king’s headless body dumped on the beach (4).

The death of Priam signifies the end of Troy, and (between sections 4 and 5) Aeneas’ mother, Venus, shows her son the gods tearing the city to pieces. Aeneas has no choice but to follow the advice he has been given, gather his family together, and meet with the other surviving Trojans at the temple of Ceres, outside the city walls.

Aeneas gives his father, Anchises, instructions for leaving (5) and fearfully sets out with his whole family (6). But, in the confusion, he loses his wife, Creusa (7). Aeneas sees Creusa’s phantom, who tells him to go on without her (8). At the end of Creusa’s speech, Aeneas tries to hug her, but fails (9).

506-517 – Priam arms himself.

Latin

forsitan et Priami fuerint quae fata requiras.

urbis uti captae casum convulsaque vidit

limina tectorum et medium in penetralibus hostem,

arma diu senior desueta trementibus aevo

circumdat nequiquam umeris et inutile ferrum 510

cingitur, ac densos fertur moriturus in hostes.

aedibus in mediis nudoque sub aetheris axe

ingens ara fuit iuxtaque veterrima laurus

incumbens arae atque umbra complexa penates.

hic Hecuba et natae nequiquam altaria circum, 515

praecipites atra ceu tempestate columbae,

condensae et divum amplexae simulacra sedebant.

Interlinear

forsitan et Priami fuerint quae fata requiras.
Perhaps you may also ask what was the fate of Priam.

urbis uti captae casum convulsaque vidit
When he saw the fall of his captured city and the smashed-in

limina tectorum et medium in penetralibus hostem,
doors of the buildings and the enemy in the middle of the inner chambers,

arma diu senior desueta trementibus aevo
the old man in vain put on his long-neglected armour on his shoulders,

circumdat nequiquam umeris et inutile ferrum
which were trembling with old age, and wore the useless

cingitur, ac densos fertur moriturus in hostes.
sword, and carried himself into the thick of the enemy, doomed to die.

aedibus in mediis nudoque sub aetheris axe
In the middle of the palace and under the exposed wheel of heaven

ingens ara fuit iuxtaque veterrima laurus
there was a huge altar and a very old laurel tree alongside it,

incumbens arae atque umbra complexa penates.
resting on the altar and embracing the household gods with its shade.

hic Hecuba et natae nequiquam altaria circum,
Here Hecuba and her daughters were crowded round the altar in vain,

praecipites atra ceu tempestate columbae,
like doves driven headlong in a black storm,

condensae et divum amplexae simulacra sedebant.
and they sat embracing the statues of the gods.

Translation

Perhaps you may also ask what was the fate of Priam.

When he saw the fall of his captured city and the smashed-in

doors of the buildings and the enemy in the middle of the inner chambers,

the old man in vain put on his long-neglected armour on his shoulders,

which were trembling with old age, and wore the useless

sword, and carried himself into the thick of the enemy, doomed to die.

In the middle of the palace and under the exposed wheel of heaven

there was a huge altar and a very old laurel tree alongside it,

resting on the altar and embracing the household gods with its shade.

Here Hecuba and her daughters were crowded round the altar in vain,

like doves driven headlong in a black storm,

and they sat embracing the statues of the gods.

518-532 – Hecuba speaks to Priam. Polites collapses.

Latin

ipsum autem sumptis Priamum iuvenalibus armis

ut vidit, ‘quae mens tam dira, miserrime coniunx,

impulit his cingi telis? aut quo ruis?’ inquit. 520

‘non tali auxilio nec defensoribus istis

tempus eget; non, si ipse meus nunc adforet Hector,

huc tandem concede; haec ara tuebitur omnes,

aut moriere simul.’ sic ore effata recepit

ad sese et sacra longaevum in sede locavit. 525

Ecce autem elapsus Pyrrhi de caede Polites,

unus natorum Priami, per tela, per hostes

porticibus longis fugit et vacua atria lustrat

saucius. illum ardens infesto vulnere Pyrrhus

insequitur, iam iamque manu tenet et premit hasta, 530

ut tandem ante oculos evasit et ora parentum,

concidit ac multo vitam cum sanguine fudit.

Interlinear

ipsum autem sumptis Priamum iuvenalibus armis
Moreover, when she saw Priam himself, having taken up the arms

ut vidit, ‘quae mens tam dira, miserrime coniunx,
of his youth, she said ‘What intention so dreadful, most wretched husband,

impulit his cingi telis? aut quo ruis?’ inquit.
drives (you) to gird yourself with these weapons? Where are you

‘non tali auxilio nec defensoribus istis
rushing to? The situation is not in need of such assistance, nor of

tempus eget; non, si ipse meus nunc adforet Hector,
these defenders; not if my Hector himself were now present,

huc tandem concede; haec ara tuebitur omnes,
come here now; this altar will protect everyone,

aut moriere simul.’ sic ore effata recepit
or you will die with us.’ Having spoken thus, she received the aged man

ad sese et sacra longaevum in sede locavit.
to her and placed him on the sacred seat.

Ecce autem elapsus Pyrrhi de caede Polites,
But look! Having slipped away from the butchery of Pyrrhus, Polites,

unus natorum Priami, per tela, per hostes
one of the sons of Priam, fled through the missiles, through the enemy,

porticibus longis fugit et vacua atria lustrat
down the long colonnades and wanders around the deserted rooms

saucius. illum ardens infesto vulnere Pyrrhus
wounded. Pyrrhus eagerly pursues him with threatening wound.

insequitur, iam iamque manu tenet et premit hasta,
Again and again he nearly seizes him with his hand and he presses with his spear,

ut tandem ante oculos evasit et ora parentum,
when at last he emerged before the eyes and the faces of his parents,

concidit ac multo vitam cum sanguine fudit.
he fell and poured out his life with much blood.

Translation

Moreover, when she saw Priam himself, having taken up the arms

of his youth, she said ‘What intention so dreadful, most wretched husband,

drives (you) to gird yourself with these weapons? Where are you

rushing to? The situation is not in need of such assistance, nor of

these defenders; not if my Hector himself were now present,

come here now; this altar will protect everyone,

or you will die with us.’ Having spoken thus, she received the aged man

to her and placed him on the sacred seat.

But look! Having slipped away from the butchery of Pyrrhus, Polites,

one of the sons of Priam, fled through the missiles, through the enemy,

down the long colonnades and wanders around the deserted rooms

wounded. Pyrrhus eagerly pursues him with threatening wound.

Again and again he nearly seizes him with his hand and he presses with his spear,

when at last he emerged before the eyes and the faces of his parents,

he fell and poured out his life with much blood.

533-543 – Priam rebukes Pyrrhus.

Latin

hic Priamus, quamquam in media iam morte tenetur,

non tamen abstinuit nec voci iraeque pepercit:

‘at tibi pro scelere,’ exclamat, ‘pro talibus ausis 535

di, si qua est caelo pietas quae talia curet,

persolvant grates dignas et praemia reddant

debita, qui nati coram me cernere letum

fecisti et patrios foedasti funere vultus.

at non ille, satum quo te mentiris, Achilles 540

talis in hoste fuit Priamo; sed iura fidemque

supplicis erubuit corpusque exsangue sepulcro

reddidit Hectoreum meque in mea regna remisit.’

Interlinear

hic Priamus, quamquam in media iam morte tenetur,
Here Priam, although he was now being held in the middle of death,

non tamen abstinuit nec voci iraeque pepercit:
nevertheless he did not hold back nor spare his voice and anger:

‘at tibi pro scelere,’ exclamat, ‘pro talibus ausis
He shouted: ‘For wickedness, for such brazen acts,

di, si qua est caelo pietas quae talia curet,
if there is any holiness in heaven which takes interest in such matters,

persolvant grates dignas et praemia reddant
may the gods pay worthy thanks and give due rewards,

debita, qui nati coram me cernere letum
you who have made me watch the death of my son in person

fecisti et patrios foedasti funere vultus.
and befouled a father’s features with death.

at non ille, satum quo te mentiris, Achilles
But he, from whom you falsely state that you were born, Achilles

talis in hoste fuit Priamo; sed iura fidemque
was not such a man in the case of his enemy Priam; but he respected

supplicis erubuit corpusque exsangue sepulcro
the laws and trust of a suppliant and returned Hector’s bloodless body

reddidit Hectoreum meque in mea regna remisit.’
to the tomb and sent me back into my kingdom.’

Translation

Here Priam, although he was now being held in the middle of death,

nevertheless he did not hold back nor spare his voice and anger:

He shouted: ‘For wickedness, for such brazen acts,

if there is any holiness in heaven which takes interest in such matters,

may the gods pay worthy thanks and give due rewards,

you who have made me watch the death of my son in person

and befouled a father’s features with death.

But he, from whom you falsely state that you were born, Achilles

was not such a man in the case of his enemy Priam; but he respected

the laws and trust of a suppliant and returned Hector’s bloodless body

to the tomb and sent me back into my kingdom.’

544-558 – Pyrrhus kills Priam.

Latin

sic fatus senior telumque imbelle sine ictu

coniecit, rauco quod protinus aere repulsum, 545

et summo clipei nequiquam umbone pependit.

cui Pyrrhus: ‘referes ergo haec et nuntius ibis

Pelidae genitori. illi mea tristia facta

degeneremque Neoptolemum narrare memento.

nunc morere.’ hoc dicens altaria ad ipsa trementem 550

traxit et in multo lapsantem sanguine nati,

implicuitque comam laeva, dextraque coruscum

extulit ac lateri capulo tenus abdidit ensem.

haec finis Priami fatorum, hic exitus illum

sorte tulit Troiam incensam et prolapsa videntem 555

Pergama, tot quondam populis terrisque superbum

regnatorem Asiae. iacet ingens litore truncus,

avulsumque umeris caput et sine nomine corpus.

Interlinear

sic fatus senior telumque imbelle sine ictu
So spoke the elderly man and he hurled the unwarlike weapon

coniecit, rauco quod protinus aere repulsum,
without a blow, which was repulsed straightaway by the echoing bronze,

et summo clipei nequiquam umbone pependit.
and it hung idly from the top of the boss of the shield.

cui Pyrrhus: ‘referes ergo haec et nuntius ibis
Pyrrhus (replied) to him: ‘So you will take this back and you will go as a

Pelidae genitori. illi mea tristia facta
messenger to my father, the son of Peleus. Remember to tell him

degeneremque Neoptolemum narrare memento.
of my sorry deeds and the worthless Neoptolemus.

nunc morere.’ hoc dicens altaria ad ipsa trementem
Now die.’ As he said this he dragged him to the altar itself, trembling

traxit et in multo lapsantem sanguine nati,
and sliding in lots of his son’s blood,

implicuitque comam laeva, dextraque coruscum
and he entwined his hair with his left hand, and with his right hand raised

extulit ac lateri capulo tenus abdidit ensem.
his glimmering sword and drove it into his side as far as the hilt.

haec finis Priami fatorum, hic exitus illum
This was the end of Priam’s destiny, this destruction brought him

sorte tulit Troiam incensam et prolapsa videntem
by chance a burning Troy and seeing Pergamum

Pergama, tot quondam populis terrisque superbum
collapsed, once the proud ruler of so many peoples and lands

regnatorem Asiae. iacet ingens litore truncus,
in Asia. His huge trunk lay on the shore,

avulsumque umeris caput et sine nomine corpus.
and his head ripped from his shoulders and a body without a name.

Translation

So spoke the elderly man and he hurled the unwarlike weapon

without a blow, which was repulsed straightaway by the echoing bronze,

and it hung idly from the top of the boss of the shield.

Pyrrhus (replied) to him: ‘So you will take this back and you will go as a

messenger to my father, the son of Peleus. Remember to tell him

of my sorry deeds and the worthless Neoptolemus.

Now die.’ As he said this he dragged him to the altar itself, trembling

and sliding in lots of his son’s blood,

and he entwined his hair with his left hand, and with his right hand raised

his glimmering sword and drove it into his side as far as the hilt.

This was the end of Priam’s destiny, this destruction brought him

by chance a burning Troy and seeing Pergamum

collapsed, once the proud ruler of so many peoples and lands

in Asia. His huge trunk lay on the shore,

and his head ripped from his shoulders and a body without a name.

705-720 – Aeneas gathers his family.

Latin

Dixerat ille, et iam per moenia clarior ignis 705

auditur, propiusque aestus incendia volvunt.

‘ergo age, care pater, cervici imponere nostrae;

ipse subibo umeris nec me labor iste gravabit;

quo res cumque cadent, unum et commune periculum,

una salus ambobus erit. mihi parvus Iulus 710

sit comes, et longe servet vestigia coniunx.

vos, famuli, quae dicam animis advertite vestris.

est urbe egressis tumulus templumque vetustum

desertae Cereris, iuxtaque antiqua cupressus

religione patrum multos servata per annos. 715

hanc ex diverso sedem veniemus in unam.

tu, genitor, cape sacra manu patriosque penates,

me bello e tanto digressum et caede recenti

attrectare nefas, donec me flumine vivo

abluero.’ 720

Interlinear

Dixerat ille, et iam per moenia clarior ignis
He had spoken, and now the fire was heard more clearly through

auditur, propiusque aestus incendia volvunt.
the city, and the fires rolled their fiery flood closer.

‘ergo age, care pater, cervici imponere nostrae;
‘So come, dear father, place yourself upon my neck;

ipse subibo umeris nec me labor iste gravabit;
I myself will support (you) on my shoulders, nor will this task weigh me down;

quo res cumque cadent, unum et commune periculum,
however things happen, there will be for both of us one common

una salus ambobus erit. mihi parvus Iulus
danger, one salvation. Let little Iulus be my companion,

sit comes, et longe servet vestigia coniunx.
and let my wife follow our steps from a distance.

vos, famuli, quae dicam animis advertite vestris.
You, servants, turn your attention to what I am about to say.

est urbe egressis tumulus templumque vetustum
There is, when you have gone out from the city, a tomb and an ancient temple

desertae Cereris, iuxtaque antiqua cupressus
of deserted Ceres, and close by an ancient cypress tree

religione patrum multos servata per annos.
protected for many years by the religious observance of our ancestors

hanc ex diverso sedem veniemus in unam.
From different (directions) we shall come to this single resting-place.

tu, genitor, cape sacra manu patriosque penates,
You, father, take the sacred emblems in your hand and the penates of your fathers,

me bello e tanto digressum et caede recenti
it is sinful for me to touch them, having come from such a mighty war and

attrectare nefas, donec me flumine vivo
fresh slaughter, until in a running river I have

abluero.’
cleansed myself .’

Translation

He had spoken, and now the fire was heard more clearly through

the city, and the fires rolled their fiery flood closer.

‘So come, dear father, place yourself upon my neck;

I myself will support (you) on my shoulders, nor will this task weigh me down;

however things happen, there will be for both of us one common

danger, one salvation. Let little Iulus be my companion,

and let my wife follow our steps from a distance.

You, servants, turn your attention to what I am about to say.

There is, when you have gone out from the city, a tomb and an ancient temple

of deserted Ceres, and close by an ancient cypress tree

protected for many years by the religious observance of our ancestors

From different (directions) we shall come to this single resting-place.

You, father, take the sacred emblems in your hand and the penates of your fathers,

it is sinful for me to touch them, having come from such a mighty war and

fresh slaughter, until I have cleansed myself in a running river.’

721-729 – Aeneas sets out.

Latin

haec fatus latos umeros subiectaque colla

veste super fulvique insternor pelle leonis,

succedoque oneri; dextrae se parvus lulus

implicuit sequiturque patrem non passibus aequis;

pone subit coniunx. ferimur per opaca locorum, 725

et me, quem dudum non ulla iniecta movebant

tela neque adverso glomerati ex agmine Grai,

nunc omnes terrent aurae, sonus excitat omnis

suspensum et pariter comitique onerique timentem.

Interlinear

haec fatus latos umeros subiectaque colla
Having said this, I covered myself, on top of my broad shoulders

veste super fulvique insternor pelle leonis,
and bowed neck, with the tawny hide of a lion as clothing,

succedoque oneri; dextrae se parvus lulus
and I submitted to the burden; little Iulus entwined himself in my

implicuit sequiturque patrem non passibus aequis;
right hand and followed his father with steps not equivalent;

pone subit coniunx. ferimur per opaca locorum,
my wife followed behind. We took ourselves through the shades of the region,

et me, quem dudum non ulla iniecta movebant
and me, whom a short time ago not any launched missiles

tela neque adverso glomerati ex agmine Grai,
would move, nor the Greeks massed in opposing ranks,

nunc omnes terrent aurae, sonus excitat omnis
now all breezes terrified (me), every sound startled (me),

suspensum et pariter comitique onerique timentem.
hesitating and equally fearful for both my companion and my burden.

Translation

Having said this, I covered myself, on top of my broad shoulders

and bowed neck, with the tawny hide of a lion as clothing,

and I submitted to the burden; little Iulus entwined himself in my

right hand and followed his father with steps not equivalent;

my wife followed behind. We took ourselves through the shades of the region,

725

and me, whom a short time ago not any launched missiles

would move, nor the Greeks massed in opposing ranks,

now all breezes terrified (me), every sound startled (me),

hesitating and equally fearful for both my companion and my burden.

730-740 – Creusa is lost.

Latin

iamque propinquabam portis omnemque videbar 730

evasisse viam, subito cum creber ad aures

visus adesse pedum sonitus, genitorque per umbram

prospiciens ‘nate’ exclamat ‘fuge, nate; propinquant.

ardentes clipeos atque aera micantia cerno.’

hic mihi nescio quod trepido male numen amicum735

confusam eripuit mentem. namque avia cursu

dum sequor et nota excedo regione viarum,

heu misero coniunx fatone erepta Creusa

substitit, erravitne via seu lassa resedit,

incertum; nec post oculis est reddita nostris. 740

Interlinear

iamque propinquabam portis omnemque videbar
And now I was approaching the gates and I thought I had traversed

evasisse viam, subito cum creber ad aures
the whole path, when suddenly, thick upon my ears,

visus adesse pedum sonitus, genitorque per umbram
there seemed to be the sound of feet, and my father, looking out

prospiciens ‘nate’ exclamat ‘fuge, nate; propinquant.
through the shade, shouted: ’Son! Flee, son! They are drawing near.

ardentes clipeos atque aera micantia cerno.’
I see eager shields and gleaming bronze.’

hic mihi nescio quod trepido male numen amicum
Here, an unfriendly power – I know not what – robbed my perplexed

confusam eripuit mentem. namque avia cursu
mind from me as I panicked. For while I was following pathless tracks

dum sequor et nota excedo regione viarum,
with haste and departing from the known direction of the roads –

heu misero coniunx fatone erepta Creusa
Alas! – my wife Creusa, snatched away by a wretched destiny,

substitit, erravitne via seu lassa resedit,
stood still, or did she wander from the path or sit down tired?

incertum; nec post oculis est reddita nostris.
I am not sure; nor later was she restored to our eyes.

Translation

And now I was approaching the gates and I thought I had traversed

the whole path, when suddenly, thick upon my ears,

there seemed to be the sound of feet, and my father, looking out

through the shade, shouted: ’Son! Flee, son! They are drawing near.

I see eager shields and gleaming bronze.’

Here, an unfriendly power – I know not what – robbed my perplexed

mind from me as I panicked. For while I was following pathless tracks

with haste and departing from the known direction of the roads –

Alas! – my wife Creusa, snatched away by a wretched destiny,

stood still, or did she wander from the path or sit down tired?

I am not sure; nor later was she restored to our eyes.

768-779 – Creusa appears to Aeneas.

Latin

ausus quin etiam voces iactare per umbram

implevi clamore vias, maestusque Creusam

nequiquam ingeminans iterumque iterumque vocavi. 770

quaerenti et tectis urbis sine fine ruenti

infelix simulacrum atque ipsius umbra Creusae

visa mihi ante oculos et nota maior imago,

obstipui, steteruntque comae et vox faucibus haesit.

tum sic adfari et curas his demere dictis: 775

‘quid tantum insano iuvat indulgere dolori,

o dulcis coniunx? non haec sine numine divum

eveniunt; nec te hinc comitem asportare Creusam

fas, aut ille sinit superi regnator Olympi.

Interlinear

ausus quin etiam voces iactare per umbram
Why, even daring to cast my cries through the night

implevi clamore vias, maestusque Creusam
I filled the streets with shouting, and gloomily repeating

nequiquam ingeminans iterumque iterumque vocavi.
“Creusa” in vain, I called again and again.

quaerenti et tectis urbis sine fine ruenti
As I searched and as I rushed endlessly among the houses of the city

infelix simulacrum atque ipsius umbra Creusae
the sad phantom and ghost of Creusa herself

visa mihi ante oculos et nota maior imago,
appeared before my eyes, an even larger likeness than the one I knew,

obstipui, steteruntque comae et vox faucibus haesit.
I was speechless, and my hair stood on end and my voice stuck in my throat.

tum sic adfari et curas his demere dictis:
Then she said this and removed my troubles with these words:

‘quid tantum insano iuvat indulgere dolori,
‘Why does it help so much to indulge in frantic grief,

o dulcis coniunx? non haec sine numine divum
sweet husband? These things are not happening without the will

eveniunt; nec te hinc comitem asportare Creusam
of the gods; nor is it lawful for you to carry away Creusa from here as a

fas, aut ille sinit superi regnator Olympi.
companion, nor does that ruler of high Olympus allow it.

Translation

Why, even daring to cast my cries through the night

I filled the streets with shouting, and gloomily repeating

“Creusa” in vain, I called again and again.

As I searched and as I rushed endlessly among the houses of the city

the sad phantom and ghost of Creusa herself

appeared before my eyes, an even larger likeness than the one I knew,

I was speechless, and my hair stood on end and my voice stuck in my throat.

Then she said this and removed my troubles with these words:

‘Why does it help so much to indulge in frantic grief,

sweet husband? These things are not happening without the will

of the gods; nor is it lawful for you to carry away Creusa from here as a

companion, nor does that ruler of high Olympus allow it.

780-794 – Creusa’s prophecy.

Latin

longa tibi exsilia et vastum maris aequor arandum, 780

et terram Hesperiam venies, ubi Lydius arva

inter opima virum leni fluit agmine Thybris:

illic res laetae regnumque et regia coniunx

parta tibi; lacrimas dilectae pelle Creusae.

non ego Myrmidonum sedes Dolopumve superbas 785

aspiciam aut Grais servitum matribus ibo,

Dardanis et divae Veneris nurus;

sed me magna deum genetrix his detinet oris.

iamque vale et nati serva communis amorem.’

haec ubi dicta dedit, lacrimantem et multa volentem 790

dicere deseruit, tenuesque recessit in auras,

ter conatus ibi collo dare bracchia circum;

ter frustra comprensa manus effugit imago,

par levibus ventis volucrique simillima somno.

Interlinear

longa tibi exsilia et vastum maris aequor arandum,
Long exile is yours and a vast expanse of sea must you plough,

et terram Hesperiam venies, ubi Lydius arva
and you will come to the land of Hesperia, where the Lydian Tiber

inter opima virum leni fluit agmine Thybris:
flows among the rich fields of men with a gentle course:

illic res laetae regnumque et regia coniunx
there happy times, and a kingdom, and a royal wife

parta tibi; lacrimas dilectae pelle Creusae.
are won for you; banish tears for dear Creusa.

non ego Myrmidonum sedes Dolopumve superbas
I shall not look upon the proud settlements of the Myrmidons or

aspiciam aut Grais servitum matribus ibo,
the Dolopians, nor shall I go into slavery for Greek mothers,

Dardanis et divae Veneris nurus;
(I) a Dardanian and the daughter-in-law of the goddess Venus.

sed me magna deum genetrix his detinet oris.
But the great mother of the gods keeps me on these shores.

iamque vale et nati serva communis amorem.’
And now farewell, and guard the love for our mutual child.’

haec ubi dicta dedit, lacrimantem et multa volentem
When she had granted these words, she left me crying and wanting

dicere deseruit, tenuesque recessit in auras,
to say many things, and withdrew into the faint breezes.

ter conatus ibi collo dare bracchia circum;
I tried three times on the spot to put my arms around her neck;

ter frustra comprensa manus effugit imago,
three times the phantom escaped my hands, grasping in vain,

par levibus ventis volucrique simillima somno.
like light winds and most similar to winged sleep.

Translation

Long exile is yours and a vast expanse of sea must you plough,

and you will come to the land of Hesperia, where the Lydian Tiber

flows among the rich fields of men with a gentle course:

there happy times, and a kingdom, and a royal wife

are won for you; banish tears for dear Creusa.

I shall not look upon the proud settlements of the Myrmidons or

the Dolopians, nor shall I go into slavery for Greek mothers,

(I) a Dardanian and the daughter-in-law of the goddess Venus.

But the great mother of the gods keeps me on these shores.

And now farewell, and guard the love for our mutual child.’

When she had granted these words, she left me crying and wanting

to say many things, and withdrew into the faint breezes.

I tried three times on the spot to put my arms around her neck;

three times the phantom escaped my hands, grasping in vain,

like light winds and most similar to winged sleep.

Aeneid II Translation Passage Quiz

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